Featuring posts written by the DoseSpot e-Prescribing Integration Team!

Honing in on HealthKit: An App Review

Posted: November 25th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Basics, In the News | Tags: , , , , , , , , | No Comments »

A few weeks ago, MobiHealthNews rounded up an updated list of the health and wellness apps that connect to Apple’s HealthKit, a health and fitness data exchange that facilitates data sharing between iOS apps. With a total of 137 apps, MobiHealthNews analyzed the ways in which these apps integrate with HealthKit—some only pull data, some only push data and about 20 percent do both. When all analyses were complete, the major point discovered was this: while HealthKit makes it possible to share dozens of different types of health and fitness data, most apps make use of the same few data points. Active calories and weight data are both among the top three most popular data types to push or pull from HealthKit. Take a look below to see the full results!

Number of apps pushing various kinds of data (or “writing”) to Apple HealthKit.

  • 34 percent of HealthKit apps (46) are pushing active calories data.
  • 20 percent of HealthKit apps (28) are pushing weight data.
  • 18 percent of HealthKit apps (25) are writing heart rate data.
  • 18 percent (24) are pushing workouts data to HealthKit, even though the Apple Health app doesn’t have such a field.
  • 15 percent of HealthKit apps (21) are feeding step count data into the platform.
  • 15 percent (20) are sharing walking and running distance data with HealthKit.
  • 10 percent of HealthKit apps (14) are pushing out sleep analysis data.
  • 9 percent (12) are sharing nutrition data with the HealthKit ecosystem.
  • 8 percent (11) are pushing out blood pressure data with HealthKit.
  • 7 percent of HealthKit apps (9) are writing cycling distance data.

Number of apps pulling various kinds of data (or “reading”) from Apple HealthKit

  • 23 percent of HealthKit apps (32) are pulling weight data.
  • 16 percent (22) are integrating step count data from HealthKit.
  • 12 percent (17) are using active calories data from the platform.
  • 10 percent of HealthKit apps (14) are using heart rate data pulled from the system.
  • 10 percent (14) are pulling down blood pressure data from HealthKit.
  • 9 percent (13) make use of walking and running distance data retrieved from HealthKit.
  • 9 percent (13) are pulling nutrition data from HealthKit.
  • 9 percent of HealthKit apps (12) are using sleep analysis data from the platform.
  • 7 percent of HealthKit-connected apps are using the platform to pull in a user’s height.
  • 7 percent (9) are pulling in a user’s birthdate from HealthKit.

SOURCE: MobiHealthNews

About DoseSpot 
DoseSpot is a Surescripts certified e-Prescribing platform specifically designed to integrate with electronic health record, electronic dental record, practice management and telehealth software. DoseSpot is certified to e-Prescribe controlled substances and has provided simple, affordable and integratable e-Prescribing solutions to healthcare IT companies since 2009. For more information, please visit www.DoseSpot.com.


Keeping Up With the Healthcare Happenings

Posted: September 22nd, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Basics, In the News, Incentives, Public Policy, Telehealth | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | No Comments »

With the 2014 calendar year coming to a close in just a few months (gasp!), HealthWorks Collective, an online health and editorial community, has released its list of health trends to keep an eye on through 2015. Think your predictions are spot on? Take a look below to see what’s on tap for the U.S. healthcare industry:

1. More providers will be hiring health coaches.
Chronic conditions in the U.S. continue to increase—so will employment. Health coaches fill a unique demand for managing chronic conditions, as they engage with patients one-on-one and keep clinical staff informed about financial or family concerns, marital problems, treatment plan adherence, etc.

2. Healthcare mobile apps on the rise.

With the release of Apple’s new Healthkit along with a slew of other mobile-friendly health apps, this trend is likely to continue for the foreseeable future. Patient-centered apps for monitoring aspects of health like calorie-counting and heart rate are gaining popularity at a quick pace and healthcare systems will continue developing and implementing apps to improve patient experience.

3. New care and payment models will expand.

Insurance companies, Medicare and Medicaid programs will continue to push for more relationships with accountable care organizations (ACOs). Different payment models will also be proposed—many healthcare professionals anticipate a trend towards “shared savings” incentives with physicians based on lowering cost and improving care quality.

4. Big Data will play a key role in patient care.

Electronic health records and other emerging technologies enable providers to automate processes and capture vital clinical data. These technologies, however, are limited in not being open to innovation. By the end of 2014, expect provider advocacy for making application interfaces open-source so they can be used to create new and exciting programs.

5. Healthcare comes to the home.

Technological advancements and increasing healthcare access will lead to more remote care services. This means that more patients can be monitored and coached to health at any time and place. “At-home healthcare” will increase patient quality of care, improve patient satisfaction, and reduce costs.

6. Increasing transparency.

Expect the level of transparency demanded from healthcare systems to increase, along with the production of tools to help inform patients. The price of treatments, procedures and clinicians along with performance metrics and hospital outcome reports will all be made available for patients to peruse at the click of a mouse.

7. Partnerships for care delivery will expand.

Healthcare partnerships will soon include community-based groups such as social service agencies, gyms and other non-healthcare service providers. As the industry strives to better address population health management, expect more unconventional approaches to healthcare such as church-based group care sessions, outdoor exercise at nature centers, reduced price health care transportation services, etc.

Source: HealthWorks Collective

For more information on the aforementioned trends, check out HealthWorks Collective’s full article here.

About DoseSpot

DoseSpot is a Surescripts™ certified e-Prescribing platform specifically designed to integrate with electronic health record, electronic dental record, practice management and telehealth software. DoseSpot has provided simple, affordable and integratable e-Prescribing solutions to healthcare IT companies since 2009. For more information, please visit www.DoseSpot.com.

 

 

 


“Map My Body:” Google’s Newest Health Endeavor Spans the Genome

Posted: July 31st, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Basics, In the News | Tags: , , , , , , , | No Comments »

 

SOURCE: Vanity Fair

We’re surrounded by hundreds of health terms on a daily basis, but what does it truly mean to be “healthy”? Google X, the research branch of Google, may soon have an answer for us. As first reported by the Wall Street Journal and later confirmed by Google, Google X has embarked on a bio-medical research project called ‘Baseline Study’ that will aggregate anonymous genetic and molecular information. The Study will initially test 175 people to solidify data collection methods—with thousands more to come— to create an accurate picture of the healthy human.

The 175-person pilot group will go through extensive medical testing, including blood and saliva analyses. Once completed, the Baseline Study team will review all samples with researchers at Duke University and Stanford University, the anticipated sites for the eventual, large-scale study.

In response to privacy concerns, Google told the Wall Street Journal that any data collected for Baseline will be anonymous, used only for medical purposes, and will not be shared with insurance companies. Baseline’s aim is to act as a reference database for the chemistry of a well-machined, healthy body—and, subsequently, identify abnormalities much earlier. With the birth of Baseline, the hope is that the medical community will move towards prevention rather than treatment in response to disease.

Sources: The Next Web and  Business Insider

For more information on Google’s groundbreaking health plans, check out this article by TIME Magazine: http://time.com/3045429/google-baseline-study-human-health/

About DoseSpot

DoseSpot is a Surescripts™ certified e-Prescribing platform specifically designed to integrate with electronic health record, electronic dental record, practice management and telehealth software. DoseSpot has provided simple, affordable and integratable e-Prescribing solutions to healthcare IT companies since 2009. For more information, please visit www.DoseSpot.com.